Tag Archives: philosophy

The Demand for Optimism

The world of science fiction magazines these days seems to be on the hunt for positive material. When conducting my monthly review of the SF short story market, it’s hard to escape the conclusion that in many place, stories that show a virtuous future are preferred. One magazine searches for stories that ‘show us the way back to a livable future’. Another requests stories that ‘celebrate and elevate’. Humor anthologies are in big demand. ‘Nothing dark and gloomy’ is a common refrain. ‘Eco stories’ requested, describing how we can live in a future run by solar and wind power. The list goes on. Once, I found a magazine whose mission of literary depth and engaging characters I felt I agreed with exactly. Then I noticed a small tag, noting that sometimes Vegan themes were preferred. Undeterred, I sent him my best story, at the time. It featured genocide as a major motif, but no animals were hurt, as requested. The editor rejected my story in the strongest terms…

It’s a trend that’s left me feeling a little out of place. My writing can be pretty bleak; though I’m not overly enthusiastic to describe it as such, it probably must be admitted.  My proudest achievement has always been the galaxy-scale universe my fiction is set in and, well, it’s a pretty terrible place. Approximately 50% of the time, the protagonist will wind up violently killed. Perhaps it relates to the more British traditions in fiction that influence me, and the more gloomy tone that often involves.

But I believe my work is relevant and creates real feelings in my readers. I have confidence in the validity of what I produce, at this point. The question is what form my writing will manifest in when it interacts with the professional sphere.

Yet trends in the science fiction markets are not good. Short stories markets, in particular, sometimes seem on the brink of annihilation. Many venerable old publishers and publications seem to have gone into deep hibernation, sealing their doors to outsiders. The retreating, shrinking feeling reminds me of a Savannah waterhole, drying up in the summer sun. Nobody seems to have any significant plan to reverse the decline.

I still submit, of course. But sometimes I have to laugh a little, as I imagine an editor’s face as he opens up the file to read. It’s a great story, and I’ve sent it to a great magazine, but he won’t like it. I consider my work to be highly progressive. Others do not. I speculate that my violent or misanthropic  themes can alienate some of those whose perspectives I share, but I maintain reporting the horrors that could one day come is indeed an act of subversion against the problems of today.

Speaking of horror, the horror market is absolutely booming. The contrast is stark. Requests for horror and dark writing are everywhere. So what’s a horror story? Sometimes I will be picky over my work, and sometimes not, but this is one area where I’ll do whatever’s needed. Market my work as Horror, with SF elements? Or am I trying to sell Hard SF, with Dark elements? To a certain degree, I don’t care. Straddling genres has always been a  virtue, a rejection of arbitrary limitations.

So I produce horror now, even though I produce nearly the same as before.  Every story I write has a pretty dark background, though fear is not usually the primary purpose of the story. A small relabel, and my market situation is looking much healthier. These considerations have even produced some changes in my style. Adding in good horror scenes is always fun to write.

One conclusion is that Horror and Science Fiction markets are heading in radically different directions. One encourages visions of a hopeful future, the other almost by definition reaches a bad end. And yet, humans beings will always vote with their feet to some degree. It makes me anxious to imagine that the world of science fiction publishing is preaching to the choir, appealing to an ever dwindling core with no new recruits to replace them. Consider what has happened the the readership of actual Marvel and DC comics, as an example.

Has trends in literary science fiction fallen out of step with the society around them? Should art reflect our culture, or should art drive our culture? These are questions for different essays, of course. Certainly the world of cinema science fiction has significantly parted ways with written fiction in terms of tone and atmosphere.

If my writing reflects the world I live in, and the Horror genre more accurately reflects my writing than the Science Fiction genre, has the Science Fiction genre failed to capture our present reality?

Either way, I struggle to meet the demands of the magazines. At the risk of sounding cantankerous, I’m not going to rub my readers shoulders and tell them everything is going to be ok. Because we’re not going to be ok. It’s a new dark age out there, and it may just be getting started. I’m not going to pretend otherwise.

Right Wing Nationalism, and the Future

This post was inspired by reading the following article, on the diveristy of characters in science fiction:
https://www.wired.com/2017/02/geeks-guide-next-gen-sci-fi/#article-comments

At the time, I found the article fairly engaging. In retrospect, it’s not great in tone. My own view of the future is probably much darker than these writers expressed. But the concept of reviewing hidden implicit bias in a fictional character’s gender and ethnicity all made clear sense to me.

It’s lazy writing to rely on stereotypes, and cliches. It requires minimal effort, and can easily be derivative.  It also generally reproduces the image of the world we already had, rather than creating anything new. And it’s also inaccurate…

What surprised me most was the comments to the article. Many expressing real anger and disbelief at the article’s contents. I found it quite a shock, as I had literally not even conceived of their arguments. Am I in a bubble? Maybe.

The source of their irritation was the article’s accepted wisdom that science fiction should present viewpoints and experiences from groups outside of traditional western society. They seemed clearly to feel this were a waste of time, and a fundamentally fraudulent concept.

It’s an extremely persistent attitude in our culture, that I may well describe more in further posts. Soft forms of white supremacism in science fiction date back a very long way. An editorial by Isaac Asimov written in 1972 describes how previous editors of his in the 1950s would insist their tales of space describe a universe of white characters. The old Jetsons cartoon is another well-known example. It seems to present a clear narrative that whites have left behind the other races, as though separation was always the goal. White nationalism, in today’s language.

Even in films as considered as ethnically  diverse as Star Trek and Star Wars, the cast are still disproportionately filled with white characters, when planet Earth is considered. Gene Roddenberry made a massive effort  always worthy of respect to think outside the box.

Perhaps living in Asia has changed my perspective, but it’s hard to see dominance of the world by European ethnic groups as a serious possibility 100 years from now, like it has been over the past 500 years. Even less so 200 years in the future, and even less so after that…

One potential big difference in approaches to race can be the application of deep time in the philosophy of a writer. As a science fiction writer, the concept of deep time is perhaps the single most compelling reason I find to work in the genre. We are at the forefront of a species that has lasted 500,000 years. Regardless of what we do to the planet, I believe some form of us is certain to continue long ahead. Political structures such as the nation or  borders can only be fleetingly temporary. The history of life is one of constant adaption. The insistence that the future will preserve the cultures of the present seems absurd.

But other science fiction writers don’t feel the same way about these ideals. Odious and notorious members of the far right can tend to loudly make their presence known on the internet on these issues, and topics of culture. And they do feel like their time has come, at this present moment.

But I strongly doubt the future will look like they expect it will, no matter what happens.

The Resurgence of Rimmblog

Good evening.

I’m excited to welcome you to the humble return of Rimmblog!

We’ll be returning with a weekly format: posts every Saturday, and occasional extras during the week.

It’s been almost exactly 2 years since my last post. I think we can all agree that a lot has happened since then. For starters, I’m now permanently based in Hong Kong. It’s beautiful here and I’m very happy.  Also, 2015 and 2016 happened. It’s become a cliche to hate 2016, but I must confess to a certain feeling that the world is entering some new era of darkness. Understandings about the course of things that seemed certain only a year ago have entirely evaporated.

As someone who writes about bleak futures, it has the small benefit of keeping me focused.

Writing continues, and progress is excellent. I haven’t received professional rate publication yet. But I am close to finished a second anthology. And I’m developing finalized plans for writing beyond the scope of short stories. I’ll be posting updates as things progress.

One idea I’ve had is to set myself the challenge of inventing a new science-fiction character every day. The plan is that forcing myself to create when out of ideas will stimulate creativity. If nothing else, I can always recycle them into my RPGs 😉

It’s the 7th day of 2017 right now, so I guess I owe you seven:

  • Gladiator Pilot, competes in Aerial Contests
  • Jungle hermit with empathic link to a giant hairy beast.
  • Veteran Jetpack Infantry. Professional attitude. Loves his job.
  • Full-time artistic chef. Irritated by interruptions.
  • Alcoholic Baron, guaranteed immunity by diplomatic contracts
  • Reverent artillery shell bearer
  • Someone who has chosen to physically remain as a baby. A smart baby.

That’s it, I’m done. Catch you soon, everybody.

Smooth Editing

Legion came back from my first reader, with a delightful range of scathing comments but that’s how we get things done.

I don’t think I’ve ever ended up editing same story quite as much as this one before, but it’s helped me get my editing process down. If I have some overall doubts about a story, I produce on a separate document a summary of who each character is as a person. Then when I go back over the story, at each scene I consider if the character is demonstrating that personality in some way (short stories need to be concise). It’s surprisingly easy to throw in characters who are essentially living plot devices and forget to give them any sort of actual character, or have characters who have wildly varying personalities based on my two different interpretations of them on different days of writing. This method helps me check the characters are consistent and interesting, and provides a reliable method of checking my own work (something it can be difficult to do).

My other main method of editing I’ve realised is skim reading. After I’ve given the draft one or two rewrites, I reread the whole story very quickly, intentionally not checking every word. Often it helps to say the words quietly under your breath. If you deliberately read it quickly and loosely (something its surprisingly hard to do) I find your brain has a tendency to say each sentence exactly as you meant to express it, rather than what you actually wrote. Sometimes the difference can be significant. I’ve lost count of the number of grammar puzzles I’ve been able to solve using this method.

Editing is hard, and unfortunately it seems it can just fail sometimes. I’ve had occasions where I’ve read something through over and over, convinced it was good, and been told it was in fact full of mistakes compared to previous, more quickly produced work. Evaluating your own performance is difficult in almost any field, purely for psychological reasons. My one solid advice would be that when you do have a passage totally right, you can usually tell. If you’re unsure about something, you may need to take major steps to fix it and it could take some time.

I guess the pros just produce top quality work as standard after so much practice.

Physics is the best

Was reading an article about combat drones, and it occurred to me that in 100 years we moved from fighting wars by charging at each other with exploding sticks to fighting each other with flying robots. What made this possible? What conditions caused the acceleration in technology that no other centuries experienced? The answer I came to was the discipline of physics. Without the laws of physics being understood, not a single piece of modern technology would exist today. So physics is always a big deal, I’m cheery to say.

Of Gates and Fascists

I was going to start this article by stating that Gamergate has been something of a big deal, but then I realised saying even that is something I can’t be sure of. Is it really? What is it? What the hell is going on?

Here are two recent articles that have got me thinking:
Anti-GG:
http://www.reddit.com/r/GamerGhazi/comments/2mqbje/are_you_a_reformed_gator_what_was_your_breaking/cm6ulpd

Anti-SJW:
http://www.spectator.co.uk/features/9376232/free-speech-is-so-last-century-todays-students-want-the-right-to-be-comfortable/

Radical ideologies are developing along lines that are completely unconsidered. Some days I think our ideas of how the world functions (nation-states, etc) have grown hopelessly out of date.